Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Cat in mourning refuses to leave master's grave

Source Website: http://www.asiaone.com/malaysia/cat-mourning-refuses-leave-masters-grave?link_time=1505789900
By  The Star/Asia News Network, 19 September 2017


The white cat (pic) refusing to leave its master's grave at the Al-Hidayah Mosque in Kelibang, Malaysia.
PHOTO: The white cat (pic) refusing to leave its master's grave at the Al-Hidayah Mosque in Kelibang, Malaysia.
PHOTO: The Star/Asia News Network

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http://www.asiaone.com/malaysia/cat-mourning-refuses-leave-masters-grave?link_time=1505789900



LANGKAWI - A video clip of a white cat (pic) refusing to leave its master's grave at the Al-Hidayah Mosque in Kelibang here has gone viral.

The clip has been shared more than 22,000 times since it was uploaded at 2.42pm yesterday by Facebook user Soffuan CZ.

He wrote that his grandfather Ismail Mat passed away on Sunday shortly after he visited him.

"While the talqin was being read at the funeral, the white cat came and started circling the grave.

"My grandfather was the only one who cared for the cat while he was alive," he further wrote.



Devastated Cat Refuses to Leave Dead Owner’s Side at Funeral in Malaysia
PHOTO: Devastated Cat Refuses to Leave Dead Owner’s Side at Funeral in Malaysia
Picture posted by Bryan Ke on 19 September 2017

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https://nextshark.com/devastated-cat-refuses-leave-dead-owners-side-funeral-malaysia/



Efforts to make the cat leave by the relatives were futile as it insisted on remaining there.

Netizens were unhappy at how the cat was being treated.

One wrote that an animal will also feel sad when its master dies and it should be allowed to mourn.



PHOTO: A white cat mourning its owner’s death and refusing to leave his grave during the funeral ceremony is bringing everyone to tears.
Image via Facebook
Picture posted by Bryan Ke on 19 September 2017

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https://nextshark.com/devastated-cat-refuses-leave-dead-owners-side-funeral-malaysia/


By  The Star/Asia News Network, 19 September 2017



PHOTO: What do we really need? All we need, all we’ll ever need, is Him and the grace to live a life such that we will be welcomed into Eternity when we die. [3]
Picture posted by HDWallSource
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https://hdwallsource.com/img/2014/8/girl-mood-background-42761-43773-hd-wallpapers.jpg
https://hdwallsource.com/girl-mood-background-42761.html 



Reference
[1] The Star/Asia News Network, Cat in mourning refuses to leave master's grave, posted on 19 September 2017, http://www.asiaone.com/malaysia/cat-mourning-refuses-leave-masters-grave?link_time=1505789900

[2] Bryan Ke, Devastated Cat Refuses to Leave Dead Owner’s Side at Funeral in Malaysia, posted on on 19 September 2017, https://nextshark.com/devastated-cat-refuses-leave-dead-owners-side-funeral-malaysia/


[3] Marge Fenelon, When God closes a door, does he always open a window?, posted on 10 August 2015, http://www.patheos.com/blogs/margefenelon/2015/08/when-god-closes-a-door-does-he-always-open-a-window/

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Dialysis - How it's performed

Source Website: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/Pages/How-haemodialysis-is-performed.aspx
By NHS Choices, last reviewed on 07 July 2015


How Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Work
PHOTO: How Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Work
Picture posted by United Dialysis Center on 28 July 2016

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http://www.pompanodialysis.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/dialysistypes-1080x675.jpg
http://www.pompanodialysis.com/how-hemodialysis-and-peritoneal-dialysis-work/



There are two main types of dialysis: haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

Haemodialysis involves diverting blood into an external machine, where it's filtered before being returned to the body
Peritoneal dialysis involves pumping dialysis fluid into the space inside your abdomen (tummy) to draw out waste products from the blood passing through vessels lining the inside of the abdomen

These two treatments are outlined in more detail below.

Haemodialysis
Preparing for treatment
Before haemodialysis can start, you'll usually need to have a special blood vessel created in your arm, called an arteriovenous fistula (AV fistula). This blood vessel is created by connecting an artery to a vein.

Joining a vein and an artery together makes the blood vessel larger and stronger. This makes it easier to transfer your blood into the dialysis machine and back again.



Arteriovenous fistula (AV fistula)
PHOTO: Arteriovenous fistula (AV fistula)
A special blood vessel created in the arm by connecting an artery to a vein.
In haemodialysis, the arteriovenous fistula makes the blood vessel larger and stronger, making it easier to transfer the blood into the dialysis machine and back again.
Picture posted by Dreamstime

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The operation to create the AV fistula is usually carried out around four to eight weeks before haemodialysis begins. This allows the tissue and skin surrounding the fistula to heal.

If your blood vessels are too narrow to create an AV fistula, an alternative procedure known as an AV graft may be recommended. A piece of synthetic tubing (graft) is used to connect the artery to the vein.

As a short-term measure, or in an emergency, you may be given a neck line. This is where a small tube is inserted into a vein in your neck.

The haemodialysis process
Most people need three sessions of haemodialysis a week, with each session lasting around four hours. This can be done in hospital, or at home if you've been trained to do it yourself.



Haemodialysis
PHOTO: Haemodialysis
Posted by NHS Choices, last reviewed on 07 July 2015

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http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/PublishingImages/haemodialysis_300x174_dy7tp4.jpg
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/Pages/How-haemodialysis-is-performed.aspx



Two thin needles will be inserted into your AV fistula or graft and taped into place. One needle will slowly remove blood and transfer it to a machine called a dialyser or dialysis machine.

The dialysis machine is made up of a series of membranes that act as filters and a special liquid called dialysate.

The membranes filter waste products from your blood, which are passed into the dialysate fluid. The used dialysate fluid is pumped out of the dialyser and the filtered blood is passed back into your body through the second needle.



Haemodialysis
PHOTO: Haemodialysis
Picture posted by Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository on 17 January 2008 at 21:06

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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hemodialysis-en.svg



During your dialysis sessions, you will sit or lie on a couch, recliner or bed. You will be able to read, listen to music, use your mobile phone or sleep.

Haemodialysis isn't painful, but some people feel a bit sick and dizzy, and may have muscle cramps during the procedure. This is caused by the rapid changes in blood fluid levels that occur during the treatment.

After the dialysis session, the needles are removed and a plaster is applied to prevent bleeding. If you were treated in hospital, you can usually go home shortly afterwards.

Fluid and diet restrictions
If you're having haemodialysis, the amount of fluid you can drink will be severely restricted.

This is because the dialysis machine won't be able to remove two to three days' worth of excess fluid from your blood in four hours if you drink too much. This can lead to serious problems where excess fluid builds up in your blood, tissues and lungs.

The amount of fluid you're allowed to drink will depend on your size and weight. Most people are only allowed to drink 1,000-1,500ml (two to three pints) of fluid a day.

You'll also need to be careful what you eat while having haemodialysis because minerals such as sodium (salt), potassium and phosphorus that would normally be filtered out by your kidneys can build up to dangerous levels quickly between treatment sessions.



There is a need to be careful what to eat while having haemodialysis because minerals such as sodium (salt), potassium and phosphorus that would normally be filtered out by the kidneys can build up to dangerous levels quickly between treatment sessions.
PHOTO: There is a need to be careful what to eat while having haemodialysis because minerals such as sodium (salt), potassium and phosphorus that would normally be filtered out by the kidneys can build up to dangerous levels quickly between treatment sessions.
The amount of fluid allowed to drink will depend on the body size and weight. Most people are only allowed to drink 1,000-1,500ml (two to three pints) of fluid a day.
Picture posted by wikiHow
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http://www.wikihow.com/Gain-Weight-as-a-Recovering-Anorexic



You'll be referred to a dietitian so a suitable diet plan can be drawn up for you. Diet plans differ from person to person, but it's likely you'll be asked to avoid eating foods high in potassium and phosphorus and to cut down the amount of salt you eat.


Peritoneal dialysis
There are two main types of peritoneal dialysis:
continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) – where your blood is filtered several times during the day
automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) – where a machine helps filter your blood during the night as you sleep

Both treatments can be done at home once you've been trained to carry them out yourself. They're described in more detail below.

Preparing for treatment
Before you can have CAPD or APD, an opening will need to be made in your abdomen. This will allow the dialysis fluid (dialysate) to be pumped into the space inside your abdomen (the peritoneal cavity).



A catheter is inserted into the space inside the abdomen (the peritoneal cavity).
PHOTO: A catheter is inserted into the space inside the abdomen (the peritoneal cavity).
Picture from timeline created by Celester Loh

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An incision is usually made just below your belly button. A thin tube called a catheter is inserted into the incision and the opening will normally be left to heal for a few weeks before treatment starts.

The catheter is permanently attached to your abdomen, which some people find difficult. If you're unable to get used to the catheter, you can have it removed and switch to haemodialysis instead.

Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis
The equipment used to carry out CAPD consists of:

  • a bag containing dialysate fluid
  • an empty bag used to collect waste products
  • a series of tubing and clips used to secure both bags to the catheter
  • a wheeled stand that you can hang the bags from

Peritoneal dialysis, Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)
PHOTO: Peritoneal dialysis, Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)
Posted by NHS Choices, last reviewed on 07 July 2015
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http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/PublishingImages/ambulatory-peritoneal-dialysis_300x174_C0028768.jpg
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/Pages/How-haemodialysis-is-performed.aspx



At first, the bag containing dialysate fluid is attached to the catheter in your abdomen. This allows the fluid to flow into the peritoneal cavity, where it's left for a few hours.

While the dialysate fluid is in the peritoneal cavity, waste products and excess fluid in the blood passing through the lining of the cavity are drawn out of the blood and into the fluid.

A few hours later, the old fluid is drained into the waste bag. New fluid from a fresh bag is then passed into your peritoneal cavity to replace it, and left there until the next session. This process of exchanging the fluids is painless and usually takes about 30-40 minutes to complete.



Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)
PHOTO: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)
Picture posted by lucenxia.com

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http://www.lucenxia.com.my/page/153/Peritoneal-Dialysis/


Exchanging the fluids isn't painful, but you may find the sensation of filling your abdomen with fluid uncomfortable or strange at first. This should start to become less noticeable as you get used to it.

Most people who use CAPD need to repeat this around four times a day. Between treatment sessions, the bags are disconnected and the end of the catheter is sealed.

Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD)
Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) is similar to CAPD, except a machine is used to control the exchange of fluid while you sleep.



Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD)
PHOTO: Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD)
Posted by NHS Choices, last reviewed on 07 July 2015
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http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/PublishingImages/Peritoneal_dialysis_300x174_C0141211.jpg
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/Pages/How-haemodialysis-is-performed.aspx



You attach a bag filled with dialysate fluid to the APD machine before you go to bed. As you sleep, the machine automatically performs a number of fluid exchanges.

You'll usually need to be attached to the APD machine for 8-10 hours. At the end of the treatment session, some dialysate fluid will be left in your abdomen. This will be drained during your next session.



Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD)
PHOTO: Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD)
Picture posted by lucenxia.com

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http://www.lucenxia.com.my/files/editor_files//images/APD.png
http://www.lucenxia.com.my/page/153/Peritoneal-Dialysis/



During the night, an exchange can be temporarily interrupted if, for example, you need to get up to go to the toilet.

Some people who have APD worry that a power cut or other technical problem could be dangerous. However, it is usually safe to miss one night’s worth of exchanges as long as you resume treatment within 24 hours. You'll be given the telephone number of a 24-hour hotline you can call if you experience any technical problems.

Fluid and diet restrictions
If you're having peritoneal dialysis, there are generally fewer restrictions on diet and fluid intake compared with haemodialysis because the treatment is carried out more often.

However, you may sometimes be advised to limit how much fluid you drink and you may need to make some changes to your diet. A dietitian will discuss this with you if appropriate.

Dialysis and pregnancy
Becoming pregnant while on dialysis can sometimes be dangerous for the mother and baby.

It's possible to have a successful pregnancy while on dialysis, but you'll probably need to be monitored more closely at a dialysis unit and you may need more frequent or longer treatment sessions.

If you're considering trying for a baby, it's a good idea to discuss this with your doctor first.

Dialysis equipment
If you're having home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, the supplies and equipment you need will normally be provided by your hospital or dialysis clinic.

You'll be told how to get and store your supplies as part of your training in carrying out the procedure.

It's important to make sure you have enough supplies of equipment in case of an emergency, such as adverse weather conditions that prevent you from obtaining supplies. Your doctor or nurse may suggest keeping at least a week's worth of equipment as an emergency backup supply.

You should also let your electrical company know if you're using home haemodialysis or automated peritoneal dialysis. This is so they can treat you as a priority in the event that your electrical supply is disrupted.

By NHS Choices, last reviewed on 07 July 2015



Reference
[1]  NHS Choices, Dialysis - How it's performed, last reviewed on 07 July 2015, http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Dialysis/Pages/How-haemodialysis-is-performed.aspx

Links
cut down the amount of salt you eat - http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/goodfood/pages/cut-down-salt.aspx

Monday, September 18, 2017

Thai girl who lost both legs in Singapore MRT accident spreads positivity to hospital patients

Source Website: http://www.asiaone.com/asia/thai-girl-who-lost-both-legs-singapore-mrt-accident-spreads-positivity-hospital-patients
By Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017


Nitcharee 'Nong Than' Peneakchanasak, who lost both legs in an accident in Singapore six years ago, smilingly greets patients, listens to their problems, and shares her inspiring attitudes about how to beat the odds.
PHOTO: Nitcharee "Nong Than" Peneakchanasak, who lost both legs in an accident in Singapore six years ago, smilingly greets patients, listens to their problems, and shares her inspiring attitudes about how to beat the odds.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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Every day, a young woman in a wheelchair has been serving happiness to patients who need moral support at the World Medical Hospital.



Nitcharee 'Nong Than' Peneakchanasak, talks to patients, boost their morale and present findings on the hospital's social media accounts so that readers can learn how to make patients happy.
PHOTO: Nitcharee "Nong Than" Peneakchanasak, talks to patients, boost their morale and present findings on the hospital's social media accounts so that readers can learn how to make patients happy. She is always smiling and cheerful. She's the kind of person that patients must be happy talking to.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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Nitcharee "Nong Than" Peneakchanasak, who lost both legs in an accident in Singapore six years ago, smilingly greets patients, listens to their problems, and shares her inspiring attitudes about how to beat the odds.



Nitcharee
PHOTO: Nitcharee "Nong Than" Peneakchanasak lost both legs in an accident in Singapore six years ago.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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"Moral support is crucial to patients struggling with illnesses or injuries," said Nitcharee, now 21. "But while moral support is important, even more meaningful is our strength of mind."



Moral support is crucial to patients struggling with illnesses or injuries
PHOTO: "Moral support is crucial to patients struggling with illnesses or injuries," said Nitcharee, now 21. "But while moral support is important, even more meaningful is our strength of mind."
"It's possible to turn crises into opportunities, flaws into inspirations," she said, adding that physical disabilities did not have to be obstacles in life.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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She started working at the hospital more than one month ago under a coveted six-month contract. The World Medical Hospital has agreed to pay Nitcharee Bt1 million a month under the contract, believing that her positive mindset will benefit patients.



Nitcharee started working at the hospital more than one month ago under a coveted six-month contract.
PHOTO: Nitcharee started working at the hospital more than one month ago under a coveted six-month contract.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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"She stands out from other candidates because she does not just deliver motivational speeches. She does what she has talked about. She embodies it," said Kantaporn Harnphanich, deputy hospital director of marketing of the Thai division at the World Medical Hospital.



In recent years, Nitcharee has also been a motivational speaker and TV host.
PHOTO: Nitcharee does not just deliver motivational speeches. She does what she has talked about. She embodies it.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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http://www.asiaone.com/asia/thai-girl-who-lost-both-legs-singapore-mrt-accident-spreads-positivity-hospital-patients



Although Nitcharee faced a big loss, she has refused to give in to pain. Rather, she has mustered her courage, her resilience and optimism to live a good, useful life. Nitcharee has enrolled at the prestigious Thammasat University, studying communication.



Although Nitcharee faced a big loss, she has refused to give in to pain.
PHOTO: Although Nitcharee faced a big loss, she has refused to give in to pain. Rather, she has mustered her courage, her resilience and optimism to live a good, useful life. Nitcharee has enrolled at the prestigious Thammasat University, studying communication.
"I plan to focus on physically challenged patients," said the student of Thammasat University's Faculty of Journalism and Mass Communication.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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http://www.asiaone.com/asia/thai-girl-who-lost-both-legs-singapore-mrt-accident-spreads-positivity-hospital-patients



She has played sports, sometimes with the help of prosthetic legs, including badminton and swimming. She has also served the public, via events and campaigns she can take part in.



She has played sports, sometimes with the help of prosthetic legs, including badminton, swimming  and even dives just like able-bodied people.
PHOTO: She has played sports, sometimes with the help of prosthetic legs, including badminton, swimming  and even dives just like able-bodied people. She has joined various charity activities over the years. She has also served the public, via other events and campaigns she can take part in.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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And after winning the patient-happiness survey position at the hospital, she has spent most of her time talking to patients to lift their spirits.

"We have got very good feedback from patients" about her, Kantaporn said.

When she has no other obligation, Nitcharee has been known to spend her whole day, seven days a week, at the hospital.

She sprints around on her wheelchair, visiting inpatients in their rooms. "How are you today?" She pops out this greeting with a smile every time she meets a new patient.

Then they will talk, share their experiences, and discuss inspiring and useful principles for life. For patients with ongoing treatments, or requiring a prolonged stay at the hospital, Nitcharee has already been more like a friend.

Asked about the secrets behind her inspiring life, Nitcharee said she accepted the realities - including the hurtful ones. "I am conscious of what I think and do. When a problem arises, I look for ways to solve it, perhaps little by little," she said.



Nitcharee said she accepted the realities - including the hurtful ones.
PHOTO: Nitcharee said she accepted the realities - including the hurtful ones. "I am conscious of what I think and do. When a problem arises, I look for ways to solve it, perhaps little by little," she said.
Nitcharee said she had never tried to fool herself into believing what is not real. "I live in the realities and live my life as happily as I can," she said.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
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Nitcharee's resilience; even though she suffered the loss of her legs in the accident on Singapore's MRT tracks, she has raised herself up and been going strong since.
PHOTO: Nitcharee's resilience; even though she suffered the loss of her legs in the accident on Singapore's MRT tracks, she has raised herself up and been going strong since.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
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Nitcharee said she had never tried to fool herself into believing what is not real. "I live in the realities and live my life as happily as I can," she said.

The young, cheerful woman said that her desire to share these tips with others going through what she has, led her to apply for the post of patient-happiness surveyor.



The young, cheerful woman said that her desire to share these tips with others going through what she has, led her to apply for the post of patient-happiness surveyor.
PHOTO: The young, cheerful woman said that her desire to share these tips with others going through what she has, led her to apply for the post of patient-happiness surveyor. Just this month, 21-year-old Nitcharee landed the so-called "Best Job in Thailand".
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
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The patient-happiness surveyor position at the World Medical Hospital comes with a monthly income of Bt1 million (S$40,868) under a six-month contract.
PHOTO: The patient-happiness surveyor position at the World Medical Hospital comes with a monthly income of Bt1 million (S$40,868) under a six-month contract.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
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Nitcharee, who is now enrolled in a short course overseas, started the job on 16 August 2017.
PHOTO: Nitcharee, who is now enrolled in a short course overseas, started the job on 16 August 2017.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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"I know patients in general need moral support. So, I want to give mine to them. We can share our stories and empower each other."

She is also working on a plan to raise donations for foundations or organisations that provide prosthetic legs to those in need. Kantaporn endorses Nitcharee's plan.



Nitcharee is also working on a plan to raise donations for foundations or organisations that provide prosthetic legs to those in need.
PHOTO: Nitcharee is also working on a plan to raise donations for foundations or organisations that provide prosthetic legs to those in need.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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"Our hospital is working on the project to raise funds for the underprivileged, particularly in regards to the provision of prosthetic legs," he said.



Kantaporn endorses Nitcharee's plan to raise donations for foundations or organisations that provide prosthetic legs to those in need.
PHOTO: Kantaporn endorses Nitcharee's plan to raise donations for foundations or organisations that provide prosthetic legs to those in need. Thanks to her positive mindset, Nitcharee "Nong Than" Peneakchanasak has been flying high despite having lost both of her legs in a 2011 accident in Singapore.
PHOTO: The Nation/Asia News Network
Picture posted by Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017

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By Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, 18 September 2017



Reference
[1] Chularat Saengpassa, The Nation/Asia News Network, Thai girl who lost both legs in Singapore MRT accident spreads positivity to hospital patients, posted on 18 September 2017, http://www.asiaone.com/asia/thai-girl-who-lost-both-legs-singapore-mrt-accident-spreads-positivity-hospital-patients